Design of Prestressed Concrete By Gilbert & Mickleborough

Design of Prestressed Concrete By Gilbert & Mickleborough

Design of Prestressed Concrete

Contents of Design of Prestressed Concrete

1 Basic concepts 1
1.1 Introduction 1
1.2 Methods of prestressing 2
1.3 Introductory example 4
1.4 Transverse forces caused by draped tendons 6
1.5 Calculation of elastic stresses 9
1.6 Flexural behaviour—from initial to ultimate loads 15
1.7 Design procedures 17
1.8 References 28
2 Design properties of materials 29
2.1 Introduction 29
CONCRETE
2.2 Composition of concrete 30
2.3 Strength of concrete 30
2.4 Deformation of concrete 34
2.5 Predictions of the creep coefficient and shrinkage 42
2.6 Thermal expansion 47
STEEL
2.7 Steel used for prestressing 48
2.8 Steel relaxation 52
2.9 Non-prestressed reinforcement 54
2.10 References 58
3 Design for serviceability 60
3.1 Introduction 60
3.2 Stress limits 61
3.3 Determination of prestress and eccentricity in flexural members 64
3.4 Cable profiles 75
3.5 Short-term analysis of cross-sections 77
3.6 Time-dependent analysis of cross-sections 89
3.7 Losses of prestress 102
3.8 Deflection calculations 108
3.9 References 120
4 Ultimate flexural strength 121
4.1 Introduction 121
4.2 Flexural behaviour at overloads 122
4.3 Flexural strength theory 124
4.4 Approximate code-oriented procedures 140
4.5 Design calculations 147
4.6 Flanged sections 153
4.7 References 159
5 Design for shear and torsional strength 160
5.1 Introduction 160
SHEAR IN BEAMS
5.2 Inclined cracking 161
5.3 Effect of prestress 162
5.4 Web reinforcement 163
5.5 Shear strength 165
TORSION IN BEAMS
5.6 Compatibility torsion and equilibrium torsion 182
5.7 Effects of torsion 183
5.8 Design provisions for torsion in AS 3600–1988 185
SHEAR IN SLABS AND FOOTINGS
5.9 Punching shear 195
5.10 Design procedures for punching shear in AS 3600–1988 198
5.11 References 208
6 Anchorage zones 209
6.1 Introduction 209
6.2 Pretensioned concrete—force transfer by bond 210
6.3 Post-tensioned concrete anchorage zones 214
6.4 References 238
7 Composite members 240
7.1 Types and advantages of composite construction 240
7.2 Behaviour of composite members 242
7.3 Stages of loading 243
7.4 Determination of prestress 246
7.5 Methods of analysis at service loads 249
7.6 Ultimate flexural strength 265
7.7 Horizontal shear transfer 265
7.8 Ultimate shear strength 275
7.9 References 280
8 Design procedures for determinate beams 281
8.1 Introduction 281
8.2 Types of section 281
8.3 Initial trial section 283
8.4 Design procedures—fully prestressed beams 286
8.5 Design procedures—partially prestressed beams 312
9 Statically indeterminate members 319
9.1 Introduction 319
9.2 Tendon profiles 321
9.3 Continuous beams 323
9.4 Staticaily indeterminate frames 350
9.5 Design of continuous beams 354
9.6 References 375
10 Two-way slabs—behaviour and design 376
10.1 Introduction 376
10.2 Effects of prestress 378
10.3 Design approach—general 381
10.4 One-way slabs 382
10.5 Two-way edge-supported slabs 382
10.6 Flat plate slabs 394
10.7 Flat slabs with drop panels 415
10.8 Band-beam and slab systems 416
10.9 References 417
11 Two-way slabs—serviceability 418
11.1 Introduction 418
11.2 The balanced load stage 419
11.3 Initial sizing of slabs 421
11.4 A review of simplified slab deflection models 429
11.5 Cracking in prestressed slabs 438
11.6 Long-term deflections 442
11.7 Worked examples 443
11.8 References 452
12 Compression and tension members 454
12.1 Types of compression members 454
12.2 Classification and behaviour of compression members 455
12.3 Cross-sectional analysis—compression and bending 457
12.4 Slenderness effects 471
12.5 Reinforcement requirements in compression members 481
12.6 Tension members 483
12.7 References 489
Appendix I Alternative models for creep and shrinkage 490
A.1 Introduction 490
A.2 The ACI Committee 209 Method (1978) 490
A.3 The CEB–FIP Method (1978) 493
A.4 References 497
Index 498

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